Riding in the Yellow Submarine

cpecod:

have you ever had the urge to spoil somebody and buy them everything they’ve ever wanted because they are just so wonderful and you love them a lot and they deserve all of the nice things??? then u realize u are broke and sad

cupofteaorgtfo:

Better get my shit packed for Hogwarts the train leaves tomorrow

niccageinabearcostume:

Nobody won this day

niccageinabearcostume:

Nobody won this day

currentsinbiology:

Language of Life : Mycoplasma
Mycoplasma refers to a genus of bacteria that lack a cell wall. Without a cell wall, they are unaffected by many common antibiotics, such as penicillin, that target cell wall synthesis. 
The first strains of mycoplasma were isolated at the Pasteur Institute in 1898. Mycoplasmas are the smallest free-living organisms and considered the simplest of bacteria. Owing to their extremely basic genomes, they are like parasites exploiting host cells to fulfill their energy requirements and biosynthesis of their components.
Several species are pathogenic in humans, including M. pneumoniae, which is an important cause of atypical pneumonia and other respiratory disorders, and M. genitalium, which is believed to be involved in pelvic inflammatory diseases. Mycoplasma are the smallest living cells yet discovered,can survive without oxygen, and are usually about 0.1 µm in diameter.

currentsinbiology:

Language of Life : Mycoplasma

Mycoplasma refers to a genus of bacteria that lack a cell wall. Without a cell wall, they are unaffected by many common antibiotics, such as penicillin, that target cell wall synthesis. 

The first strains of mycoplasma were isolated at the Pasteur Institute in 1898. Mycoplasmas are the smallest free-living organisms and considered the simplest of bacteria. Owing to their extremely basic genomes, they are like parasites exploiting host cells to fulfill their energy requirements and biosynthesis of their components.

Several species are pathogenic in humans, including M. pneumoniae, which is an important cause of atypical pneumonia and other respiratory disorders, and M. genitalium, which is believed to be involved in pelvic inflammatory diseases. Mycoplasma are the smallest living cells yet discovered,can survive without oxygen, and are usually about 0.1 µm in diameter.

science-junkie:

Parasitic Plant Strangleweed Injects Host With Thousands Of Its Own Expressed Genes
Virginia Tech professor and Fralin Life Institute affiliate Jim Westwood has made a discovery about plant-to-plant communication: enormous amounts of genetic messages in the form of mRNA transcripts are transmitted from the parasitic plant Cuscuta (known more commonly as dodder and strangleweed) to its hosts.
Using Illumina next generation sequencing technologies to sequence the tissues of the host and an attached parasite, the team found that the number of genes that gets passed into the host depends on the identity of the host.  The tomato plant received 347 of the strangleweed’s mRNAs, whereas the Arabidopsis received an astonishing 9514 mRNAs.  When Arabidopsis plant receives this many mRNAs, the total genetic material of tissues in contact with the strangleweed is about 45% from the parasite.
Read more

science-junkie:

Parasitic Plant Strangleweed Injects Host With Thousands Of Its Own Expressed Genes

Virginia Tech professor and Fralin Life Institute affiliate Jim Westwood has made a discovery about plant-to-plant communication: enormous amounts of genetic messages in the form of mRNA transcripts are transmitted from the parasitic plant Cuscuta (known more commonly as dodder and strangleweed) to its hosts.

Using Illumina next generation sequencing technologies to sequence the tissues of the host and an attached parasite, the team found that the number of genes that gets passed into the host depends on the identity of the host.  The tomato plant received 347 of the strangleweed’s mRNAs, whereas the Arabidopsis received an astonishing 9514 mRNAs.  When Arabidopsis plant receives this many mRNAs, the total genetic material of tissues in contact with the strangleweed is about 45% from the parasite.

Read more

mindblowingscience:

The Ebola virus is mutating faster in humans than in animal hosts

A study that some early researchers in Sierra Leone gave their lives for has yielded incredibly important results, reports ABC Science.
The study, published in Science, reveals the rates of mutation in the deadly Ebola virus, that has so far claimed the lives of more than 1,000 people, including more than 140 health care workers. 
The samples, taken from 78 infected individuals, show that during the early outbreak more than 300 genetic changes occurred as the virus moved from person to person. Scientists say the virus is mutating about twice as fast in humans than it was in animal hosts, such as fruit bats. 
The team used a technique called deep sequencing, which allowed them to track changes in genetic sequences between different patients and within different cells inside a single patient.
The research revealed that the virus’ protein coat has changed, which could suggest that it is now better able to bind to human cells and evade the immune system.
The mutations may be significant if they reduce the effectiveness of diagnostic tests and treatments currently being developed. 
The data was pre-published online and Erica Ollmann Saphire of the Scripps Research Institute in the US says her lab has already checked whether the mutations will affect the drug they are developing to fight Ebola. It appears they do not but further tests are required to see if other drugs are still going to work.
The Ebola virus is likely to spread further and the World Health Organisation reports that some 20,000 people are at risk of infection.

mindblowingscience:

The Ebola virus is mutating faster in humans than in animal hosts

A study that some early researchers in Sierra Leone gave their lives for has yielded incredibly important results, reports ABC Science.

The study, published in Science, reveals the rates of mutation in the deadly Ebola virus, that has so far claimed the lives of more than 1,000 people, including more than 140 health care workers

The samples, taken from 78 infected individuals, show that during the early outbreak more than 300 genetic changes occurred as the virus moved from person to person. Scientists say the virus is mutating about twice as fast in humans than it was in animal hosts, such as fruit bats. 

The team used a technique called deep sequencing, which allowed them to track changes in genetic sequences between different patients and within different cells inside a single patient.

The research revealed that the virus’ protein coat has changed, which could suggest that it is now better able to bind to human cells and evade the immune system.

The mutations may be significant if they reduce the effectiveness of diagnostic tests and treatments currently being developed. 

The data was pre-published online and Erica Ollmann Saphire of the Scripps Research Institute in the US says her lab has already checked whether the mutations will affect the drug they are developing to fight Ebola. It appears they do not but further tests are required to see if other drugs are still going to work.

The Ebola virus is likely to spread further and the World Health Organisation reports that some 20,000 people are at risk of infection.

maid-en-china:

In this Field of dreams
Gazing at the infinite possibilities 
The future twinkles
With dazzlingly wonders

Full Version on dA

post-mitotic:

Godzilla blood
like those of birds, reptilian red blood cells are flatter and more oblong than their mammalian counterparts (and they’re nucleated)
colored SEM
credit: Steve Gschmeissner

post-mitotic:

Godzilla blood

like those of birds, reptilian red blood cells are flatter and more oblong than their mammalian counterparts (and they’re nucleated)

colored SEM

credit: Steve Gschmeissner

mapsontheweb:

Dante’s Inferno: a helpful diagram to eternal damnation

mapsontheweb:

Dante’s Inferno: a helpful diagram to eternal damnation

tyleroakley:

drunktrophywife:

vinebox:

Feeding the wild Teddy Bears

THIS FUCKED ME IP

ABSOLUTELY NOT

pardonmewhileipanic:

BLESS THIS FUCKING CHILD OMG

littlelotte88:

feenybobeany:

sometimes i look at people on my dash and i think

who the fuck are you

when did i follow you

you’re not posting things relative to my interests

but i can’t unfollow you becasue i can’t remember why i did

it might have been important

This is the most accurate post I have ever seen on here.